Recipe Review: Leek and Potato Galette with Pistachio Crust


This savory galette from Bon Appetit 2016 makes an elegant dinner party appetizer.  It features a unique crust made with ground pistachios (ground with a blender).  The dough is easy to make using a food processor or mixer, and the dough is very easy to roll out.  Inside the galette is a spread of garlic, goat cheese, and dill that is topped with thinly sliced Yukon gold potatoes and sauteed leeks.  There is a nice balance of flavors with the tangy goat cheese, dill, potatoes, the pistachio crust, and a drizzle of honey after baking.

Level of difficulty: medium

Cost: about $10-15

Time: about 1 hour active time, 2.5-3 hours total including refrigerating dough for one hour and baking for 40 minutes

Deliciousness: 3 of 5 stars

Make again: yes, maybe trying a different filling

Link to recipe here.

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Milk Bar Bake the Book Class


Milk Bar offers weekend classes at their Williamsburg, Brooklyn shop and I had the opportunity to go last year.  I have made some of their cakes at home, but it was a real treat to make them at Milk Bar.  Actually, it is more like assemble, because they pre-bake the cake and the crumbles and pre-made the frosting.  It was still fun, because the instructors were great, very helpful, friendly, and full of Milk Bar trivia.  After assembling the cake, we also made cake truffles.  Finally, after the class our instructor took a few super-fans on a tour of the Milk Bar bakery.  So fun!  Classes are $95 as of 2016, and you get a cake and truffles to take home.

Link to Milk Bar class schedule here.

Link to Milk Bar cookbook here.

Tartine Manufactory


Tartine Bakery is one of the best bakeries in San Francisco and for years has operated out of a small, crowded store in the Mission.  Now they have opened a much larger, beautiful new space called Tartine Manufactory about 12 blocks east from the original Tartine.  Manufactory combines a bakery, restaurant, coffee shop, and a soon-to-open ice cream counter.  Compared to the original Tartine, Manufactory has expanded breakfast and lunch options, as well as different pastries and breads.  Tartine bread really is special.  Bread at the old Tartine was available once a day after 430 PM, and now at Tartine Manufactory it is baked three times per day.  When I went on a Friday morning, they told me the first bread availability was 1030 AM, and chef-owner Chad Robertson himself was manning the enormous oven, a centerpiece of the new space.  Tartine Manufactory is in a building that also has a Blue Bottle Coffee and also houses the Heath Ceramics factory and store.  The Heath Ceramics store showcases some of beautiful (and expensive) dinnerware, tile and curated home goods.  This is a really amazing space and a definite new SF culinary landmark.

Link to Tartine Manufactory here.

Cookbook Review: Huckleberry


Someday I would love to open a place like Huckleberry, a bakery/breakfast/lunch venue in Santa Monica, CA.  I first became aware of Huckleberry when they were featured in Bon Appetit several years ago with a recipe for a delicious cornmeal blueberry cake.  Now Chef Zoe Nathan has chronicled many recipes in the Huckleberry cookbook, and I have thoroughly enjoyed baking from the book for the past few months.

The book is divided into several sections including muffins, cakes, scones, breads, fried pastries, sandwiches, and grain bowls.  What is immediately noticeable is the use of various different kinds of flours.  All-purpose flour is still the mainstay, but other flours are incorporated including whole wheat, rye, bread flour, wheat germ, and nut flours like pistachio and almond.  These different flours result in a more complex crumb and flavor and hopefully healthier recipes as well with the use of whole grains.

Healthy does not mean lack of flavor.  So far the recipes have been outstanding, with excellent versions of chocolate-chip muffins, chocolate walnut banana bread, carrot cake with cream cheese frosting, and whole-wheat raisin scones.  The most impressive were the pistachio-lemon cake, the cara cara orange galette, and the pear whole-wheat crumb cake, all of which drew raves.

The one recipe I tried that failed was the cover recipe for blueberry brioche.  This recipe called for double the flour that was required, so there was not enough egg to bind the dough.  I saved it by adding two additional eggs, but the ratio of other ingredients like butter and sugar was then off.  Chronicle Books sent me the following list of corrections:

Huckleberry ingredient and measurement corrections:

Page 43: In the ingredient list, MUFFINS, 5th entry (1 tbsp cracked) “wheat, chai seeds,” should be “wheat, chia seeds,”

Page 105: In the ingredient list, 4th line (bread flour), “1 3/4 cups/185 g” should be “1 3/4 cups/215 g”

Page 108: In the ingredient list, 4th line (all-purpose flour), “+ 2 tbsp/280 g” should be “+ 2 tbsp/140 g”; 5th line (bread flour): “+ 2 tbsp/280 g” should be “+ 2 tbsp/140 g”

The corrected version made an excellent brioche punctuated by a ribbon of fresh blueberries that was delicious hot out of the oven.  Overall, this is a great book for impressive breakfast pastries and brunch recipes, introduces a unique use of different flours, and contains a bunch of keepers.  Huckleberry takes a place among my favorite baking cookbooks including Momofuku Milk Bar, Tartine, Flour, and Bouchon Bakery.

Link to Huckleberry cookbook here.

Recipe Review: Cinnamon Cream Brioche


Cinnamon Cream Brioche

Cinnamon Cream Brioche

These Cinnamon Cream Brioche pastries from Joanne Chang’s flour, too cookbook are great.  A brioche dough base is topped with pastry cream, creme fraiche, and a dusting of cinnamon sugar.  Brioche is a rich yeasted dough made with eggs, butter, and sugar.  A stand mixer is a definite must, because a large amount of butter must be incorporated into the dough at high speed.  My mixing bowl got stuck in the base of the mixer due to the force of mixing.  If that happens, I suggest using a mallet to knock the bowl loose.  After mixing, the dough must rise in the refrigerator for a minimum of six hours, so it’s good to make the dough and pastry cream in the evening and do the final assembly and baking in the morning.  The pastry cream is pretty straightforward: scald some milk, add a mixture of cake flour, sugar, and egg yolks, whisk until thickened, and then let set overnight.  In the morning, divide the dough into pieces, shape into rounds, and top with pastry cream, creme fraiche, and cinnamon sugar, and bake.

Couple of notes on how much to make.  The recipe calls for half-recipe of brioche dough for eight pastries, but I used the full recipe to make sixteen.  I used a double recipe of pastry cream.  The creme fraiche I bought from Trader Joe’s, and two tubs were less than what was called for in the recipe but I thought was plenty.  The cinnamon sugar in the original recipe (1 1/4 cups sugar + one teaspoon cinnamon) is more than enough for sixteen pastries.

The baked pastry cream, with a little tartness from the creme fraiche and a little sweetness from the cinnamon sugar, all on top of the airy brioche dough, is a great combination and got great comments.

Cost: about $15 to make 16

Level of difficulty: moderate-difficult

Deliciousness: delicious (4 of 5 stars)

Healthy: no

Make again: yes

Link to recipe here.

Link to flour, too cookbook here.

Link to previous post on first flour cookbook here.

 

Recipe Review: Soy-Glazed Chicken with Asparagus and Scallions


Soy-glazed chicken with asparagus and scallions

Soy-glazed chicken with asparagus and scallions

This is a fast, easy, good recipe from Bon Appetit May 2014.  Chicken is marinated in a teriyaki-like sauce that contains toasted anise seed, soy sauce, honey, garlic, and lime juice (a little expensive because of the great lime shortage of 2014).  The chicken is marinated for 30 minutes up to overnight, then baked with the marinade in a 450 oven.  The recipe states that after roasting in the oven, the sauce thickens into a nice glaze.  However, in my experience, the sauce burned almost completely.  However, the chicken still came out moist and flavorful.  Asparagus and scallions are roasted at the same time and accompany the chicken nicely.

Level of difficulty: easy

Cost: about $10

Deliciousness: 3 of 5 stars (good)

Healthy: yes

Time: about 15 minutes active time + marinade time and roasting time of 30 minutes

Make again: maybe

Link to recipe here.

 

Recipe Review: Apple Snacking Spice Cake


Joanne Chang, Flour, apple snacking spice cake

Joanne Chang, Flour, apple snacking spice cake

This is an easy-to-make cake from Joanne Chang’s Flour cookbook that is also one of the most popular items at Flour Bakery in Boston.  The cake is full of spices, pecans, and raisins, and the high percentage of diced apple makes the cake really moist and flavorful.  This cake got great reviews, with people coming back for seconds.  I made a few modifications: doubling the amount of cinnamon and cloves (because mine were a little bit old) and substituting about 1 tsp of fresh ginger for powdered ginger (because I didn’t have any on hand), and baking in a 9×9 square cake pan.

Level of Difficulty: Easy

Deliciousness: 4 of 5 stars

Cost: about $10

Time: 20 minutes active time, around 1.5 hours total

Healthy: no

Make again: yes

Link to recipe here.

Link to Flour cookbook here.

Recipes from Craftsman and Wolves: Apple Gruyere Scone, Cocoa Carrot Cake with Cocoa Crumble


Several recipes from my favorite bakery, Craftsman and Wolves in San Francisco, have been published on-line.  These include a previous iteration of the cocoa carrot muffins, in cake form, and a sweet-savory apple gruyere scone.  Both are delicious and definitely worth doing.  I am hoping for the pear-yuzu croissant, the Rebel Within, and Valrhona chocolate chip cookie recipes to someday be published.  Note to Chef William Werner: cookbook, please!

Cocoa carrot cake recipe here

Apple gruyere scone recipe here

Other William Werner recipes on-line:

– Thai scones and Chocolate coffee eclair on the Starchefs site here.

– several recipes on Food and Wine, including chocolate peanut butter shortbread sandwich cookies recipe  here.

– update December 2014: C&W made it to the cover of the annual Bon Appetit Christmas issue with five recipes for Christmas sweets!  Link here.  And, the Valrhona Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe was finally published in 7×7 magazine here!

Recipe Review: Ottolenghi Hummus Kawarma (Lamb) with Lemon Sauce


Ottolenghi Hummus kawarma (lamb) with lemon sauce

Ottolenghi Hummus kawarma (lamb) with lemon sauce

In Ottolenghi’s Jerusalem: A Cookbook, there is an illuminating short essay on the importance of hummus among Israelis and Palestinians in Jerusalem, the debate about its origins, and the arguments about which hummusia makes the best hummus.

Ottolenghi’s basic hummus recipe starts from dried chickpeas that are soaked overnight.  I tried to use a blender to make the hummus, but it was difficult to process unless in small batches.  A food processor as recommended would work better.  The hummus is great, smooth and fluffy, with the right amount of garlic, lemon juice, and tahini.  There are additional recipes in the chapter for lamb kawarma, a spiced, fried chopped lamb served over hummus, and musabaha (warm chickpeas with hummus).

Cost: about $20

Time: about 2 hours

Level of Difficulty: easy-moderate

Taste: excellent (3.5 of five stars)

Healthy: fairly healthy

Make again: yes

Link to Jerusalem: A Cookbook here.

Recipe Review: Ottolenghi Stuffed Eggplant with Lamb and Pine Nuts


Ottolenghi Stuffed eggplant with lamb and pine nuts

Ottolenghi Stuffed eggplant with lamb and pine nuts

Eggplants are a staple vegetable (well technically, a fruit) in the Middle East, and feature prominently in Ottolenghi’s Jerusalem: A Cookbook.  In this recipe, the eggplant is roasted first, then stuffed with a ground lamb and pine nut filling, then braised in a spice liquid.  The filling is made with ground lamb, onions, pine nuts, and parsley, fragrant with cumin, cinnamon, and paprika.  Think the world’s best sloppy joe filling.  After roasting, stuffing, and braising, the eggplant is transformed from its raw firm and dry texture to a luscious creaminess that almost acts like a sauce for the aromatic lamb and pine nut stuffing.  I finished  with a little bit of Greek yogurt for an added dimension (there is always some around since I started cooking from this cookbook).

By the way, I like the British word for eggplant, aubergine.  Aubergine sounds so much more sophisticated, borrowed from the French and Arabic.  Eggplant, however, is actually not a misnomer as I first thought.  When the word eggplant was first coined, it referred to a variety that had pale white skin and was indeed the size and shape of an egg.  But still, aubergine seems more fitting for the beautiful purple varieties that are more commonly available today.

Cost: about $15

Time: about 2.5 hours (1-1.5 hour active time)

Level of difficulty: moderate

Taste: delicious (4 of 5 stars)

Healthy: fairly healthy

Make again: yes

Link to recipe here.  Link to Jerusalem: A Cookbook here.

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